Home | About CytoJournalEditorial Board | Archived articles | Search CytoJ Articles | Subscribe | Peer review policies | CytoJournal Quiz Cases
  Reviewer corner | Author corner | OA Steward’s corner | CF member’s corner | Join as CF member | Manuscript submission | Open Access (OA) Advocacy
Home
CytoJournal All 'FULL TEXT' in HTML are FREE under "open access" charter of CytoJournal.
To login for downloading any PDF OR to request TOC (Table of Content) by e-mail, please click here
Home Email this page Print this page Small font size Default font size Increase font size Cytopathology Foundation
Navigate Here
 »   Next article
 »   Previous article
 »   Table of Contents

Resource Links
 »   Similar in PUBMED
 »  Search Pubmed for
 »  Search in Google Scholar for
 »Related articles
 »   Citation Manager
 »   Access Statistics
 »   Reader Comments
 »   Email Alert *
 »   Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed6947    
    Printed34    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded55    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 2    

Recommend this journal

 

 RESEARCH ARTICLE
CytoJournal 2014,  11:12

Molecular testing guidelines for lung adenocarcinoma: Utility of cell blocks and concordance between fine-needle aspiration cytology and histology samples


1 Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Departments of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY 10032, USA
2 Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY 10032, USA
3 Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, The Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY 10029, USA
4 Division of Hematology/Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY 10032, USA
5 Department of Surgery, Division of General Thoracic Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY 10032, USA
6 Department of Pathology, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago IL 60611, USA

Correspondence Address:
Anjali Saqi
Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Departments of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY 10032
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1742-6413.132989

Rights and Permissions

Background: Lung cancer is a leading cause of mortality, and patients often present at a late stage. More recently, advances in screening, diagnosing, and treating lung cancer have been made. For instance, greater numbers of minimally invasive procedures are being performed, and identification of lung adenocarcinoma driver mutations has led to the implementation of targeted therapies. Advances in molecular techniques enable use of scant tissue, including cytology specimens. In addition, per recently published consensus guidelines, cytology-derived cell blocks (CBs) are preferred over direct smears. Yet, limited comparison of molecular testing of fine-needle aspiration (FNA) CBs and corresponding histology specimens has been performed. This study aimed to establish concordance of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Kirsten rat sarcoma (KRAS) virus homolog testing between FNA CBs and histology samples from the same patients. Materials and Methods: Patients for whom molecular testing for EGFR or KRAS was performed on both FNA CBs and histology samples containing lung adenocarcinoma were identified retrospectively. Following microdissection, when necessary, concordance of EGFR and KRAS molecular testing results between FNA CBs and histology samples was evaluated. Results: EGFR and/or KRAS testing was performed on samples obtained from 26 patients. Concordant results were obtained for all EGFR (22/22) and KRAS (17/17) mutation analyses performed. Conclusions: Identification of mutations in lung adenocarcinomas affects clinical decision-making, and it is important that results from small samples be accurate. This study demonstrates that molecular testing on cytology CBs is as sensitive and specific as that on histology.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article

  Site Map | Copyright and Disclaimer
© 2007 - CytoJournal | A journal by Cytopathology Foundation Inc with Wolters Kluwer - Medknow
New version online since 1st July '08
Open Access